Posts tagged ‘segmentation variables’

Segmentation in the apparel e-tailing space

Segmentation in apparel e-commerce brands - one comparative pic A friend who recently purchased some kurtas online made a chance remark about how only certain sites stocked the kind of kurtas that she was looking for and this set me looking through the catalogs of various e-commerce sites.

As the apparel e-tailing space in India has grown and evolved, various brands are consciously segmenting their audience (basis demographic variables, occasion of use etc.) and targeting specific segments ; this is evident from the conversations on their facebook pages, their ads, and of course, the offerings in their online catalogues. Even within a particular type of apparel – for instance, women’s ethnic wear, the styles, colours and prints of salwar-kameez sets or kurtis varies, as do the ages and the demeanour of the models in the pics.

 Zohraa - pic Segmentation in apparel e-commerce brands For instance, consider the salwar-kameez collection of Utsav Fashion and Zohraa. In the case of Utsav Fashions, which started off as an offline store and switched to the online model only when they realised that a significant percentage of their business was coming from NRIs abroad, it is not surprising that the focus is on occasion wear. On the other hand, Zohraa, a relatively young firm whose site started operations during the second half of 2012, recognised the opportunity to differentiate itself in a crowded online market-place and consciously decided to focus on occasion – wear, or as their website expresses it, ‘….. our collection of elegant and opulent occasion wear…. that reflects the sensibilities of the royal wardrobes of the past, while ensuring that the cut and the drape are modern, comfortable and practical for the woman of today.’   

Then consider Jabong, which started operations in January 2012 and is targeting a younger, more westernised demographic. Their youthful and light-hearted – even sometimes irreverent – attitude is displayed in the ‘fashion nikla mann fisla’ series of ads (links to the ads here, here and here). To match this, even the collection of women’s ethnic wear at Jabong is far younger, more casual and breezy, witness the difference between this set of pics and the earlier ones.  

jabong piclime road 

             

 

 

 

 

 

 

On the other hand, Suchi Mukherjee’s Lime Road, which also started in 2012 seems to be targeting a different demographic and a different usage occasion. Lime Road’s stated identity is as a social commerce site targeted at the modern woman. It seems to carry colours, prints and styles that are just perfect for the young working woman, and sits neatly in the space between Jabong’s breezy casual style and the occasion wear offered by Zohraa and Utsav Fashion.  

If you’ve noticed this in other sectors of the online apparel market, do write us a comment. Meanwhile, we’re looking at other types of apparel and accessories too, and will post on this topic again if something catches our attention.

  • Zenobia

August 28, 2014 at 11:05 am 6 comments

Limitations of the SEC classification

This article in the Indian Express today mentions a proposal for better  identification  of  the Below Poverty Line (BPL) rural poor. The proposal suggests including classes like destitute, manual scavengers and primitive tribal groups  while excluding those who own telephone landlines, refrigerators, two, three or four-wheelers, tractors, farmers with Rs.50,000 kisan credit limit, those with income of Rs.10,000/month and more.

While discussions around accurate classification of BPL poor (whether urban or rural) are led by economists, sociologists and policy experts, marketers have also been discussing the need for an accurate scale that captures spending power (of various socioeconomic groups) and consumption trends. For instance, a leading marketer such as Rama Bijapurkar has mentioned here the need to calibrate the current SEC classification with respect to asset ownership.

But, let me give some background first…

Socio Economic Classification (SEC) is a common parameter used by businesses to understand consumption potential in the Indian population. The urban SEC classification is a combination of education level and occupation of the chief wage earner of the household. According to this system, the urban Indian households are split across SEC A1, A2, B1, B2, C, D, E1 and E2.

SEC Classification Grid

Although this parameter is very commonly used, it has its drawbacks. One of the fundamental drawbacks is – since the classification is based on education and occupation level only, it misses out on the fact that income levels within an SEC can be quite disparate. The grid simply assumes that higher education and better occupation leads to higher income and thus higher consuming potential, but this may not always be the case.

Take the case of a shop owner with only primary education (classified as SEC D) who may be earning more than a graduate junior executive (classified as SEC A2); therefore the shop owner may have the potential for higher consumption, despite being categorized into a much lower SEC.

The chart below clearly illustrates how the standard SEC grid misses out on the fact that income levels within an SEC can be quite disparate. This is especially true of SEC A, and to a lesser extent, of SEC B. While there is a fairly large chunk of SEC A (34%) that earns less than Rs.3 lakh annually, the rest is composed of fairly thin slices of varying income levels. The richest slice, 16% of SEC A that earns over Rs.15 lakh per annum comprises of people of widely divergent income levels and very different purchasing power and consumption trends.

Source: Indicus Analytics

Therefore, SEC is too simplistic a classification and cannot be used as a consumer segmentation variable on its own – it needs to be layered with additional defining criteria such as income, asset ownership, etc.

Perhaps this classification did work when India was a uni-dimensional, mass market. But, with growing product offerings, new brands entering the market, more players in the market space, increased consumer involvement in decision making and higher aspirations and needs – the consumer has evolved,  and so should the way of  classifying him/ her.

By,

EV Team

May 19, 2011 at 7:03 am 16 comments


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