Posts tagged ‘consumer behaviour’

Updates

On Lifebuoy colour changing handwash :

Over a year ago, we’d written about the Lifebuoy team’s efforts to change the hand-wash habits (or lack of the same) of Indians in this post.  The post called attention to one aspect of Lifebuoy’s Swasthya Chetana campaign, the ‘glowgerm’ demonstration that children were invited to take part in. This involved applying a white powder to the palms of their hands, then washing with water only. Hands were then held under an ultra-violet light and the powder glowed where dirt remained, showing that hand-washing without soap was not enough. The children then repeated the process, this time using soap, only to discover the UV light showed no trace of the powder. This countered the common misconception that ‘visibly clean’ is ‘hygienically clean’, and, in an easy-to-understand manner, drove home the message that even clean-looking hands are dirty until washed with soap.

lifebuoy colour changing handwash 2

Now they’ve used colour changes to make another point with their latest product, Lifebuoy colour changing handwash. This time, the foam turns green after ten seconds to signal that all the germs have been wiped out. Am sure that the change in the colour as they scrub will grab every kid’s attention and ensure that they don’t wash the soap off immediately but scrub for a full ten seconds, at least while the product and the effect are still a novelty. As a communication tool, felt that the hulk mascot worked well too. You can view the ad for the product here.  

 

On the frozen yogurt market :

frozen yogurt brands

One of the trends we commented upon last year was the increasing popularity of hip frozen yogurt stores which could be termed cafés in terms of their popularity as hang-out places for youngsters.

The rapid expansion of this market has seen more competitors entering, read about the entry of foreign brands including the U.S based ‘Red Mango’, Canadian ‘Kiwi Kiss’ and others here, here, here and here.

 

  • Zenobia Driver

 

December 28, 2012 at 9:54 am Leave a comment

From the mouths of babes and sucklings – technology and toddlers

My five year old nephew was chatting with me during a journey once, bubbling over with curiosity and a million questions about everything. Instead of entertaining myself by warping his mind with made-up answers the way Calvin’s dad does (for examples, see this link), I tried to answer his questions as simply and logically as possible. However, reality is often stranger than fiction, and some answers related to geography and astronomy sounded far-fetched to him. So the young man turned his gimlet eyed gaze on me and warned me, “Are you really sure ? Don’t lie, ok. We can go home, open the laptop and check on googil too.” Once kids relied on older and wiser ones for information, now we’re redundant since there’s good ol’ googil.

Another young 3 year old – a friend’s son, gave me the next anecdote for this blogpost. He gets confused reading books because once he’s done reading the page he swipes his finger across to get to the next page – the way he’s used to doing with pics on the iphone; needless to say, that doesn’t work at all with a book and it leaves him confused, frustrated and cranky.

While on the topic of young ones and technology, there’s an interesting anecdote in this blogpost – as an aside, you should follow the link and read the whole post, interesting example of communication going awry due to incorrect assumptions. The comments on that post are also worth reading.

But I digress, the anecdote follows :

Setting, San Francisco, where some friends recently told me how their five year old went up to a framed picture in their living room and started pinching at it with his fingers, the exact same gestures one would use on an iPhone to zoom in and out of a picture. “Broken, broken” is all the five year old said after that disappointing experience.

How much and in how little time technology is changing the reading and viewing habits of this generation of toddlers ! Paraphrasing the headline of this Forbes article, does this change herald just the death of print or will it also eventually lead to the death of reading too ? I fear that it may be the latter. What’s your point of view ?

  • Zenobia Driver

November 28, 2012 at 3:59 pm Leave a comment

Moving with the times – Tag Heuer

I often wonder about the longevity of watches as a category and whether they will eventually suffer the same fate as the humble typewriter, either in a few years or a few decades. Two close friends of mine have already stopped wearing a watch on a regular basis – their logic is that they carry a phone all the time and can see the time on their phone. What’s worse – for the global watch industry, that is – they find the watch doubly redundant when at their desk in office where they can also see the time on their laptop.

Undoubtedly, the trend towards wearing a watch as an accessory will extend the category’s life-span, but for how long ? And does the watch industry have any other tricks up its sleeve or will it fall prey to marketing myopia in a decade or two ?

[Note : We’d mentioned marketing myopia once in an earlier post; the subject of this post is somewhat similar – an attempt made by a firm to adapt to a changing market, though in this case it’s early days yet and the market verdict is not  clear.

Marketing Myopia : The term refers to the short-sightedness that leads companies to focus on their own organisation and product – line rather than on customers’ needs and wants. It leads to reluctance to change, and a failure to adjust to a changing market environment.] 

 

In this context, I felt that the launch of the Tag Heuer Smartphones by the luxury watch brand was an interesting experiment (you can read articles about the launch here, here , here and here). Tag Heuer started retailing luxury mobile phones in India from 2008. It has since launched three such devices – first the Tag Heuer Meridiist and Link, and recently the Racer. The Tag Heuer Racer Smartphone (pics on extreme right in the image above) was the one launched a few months ago; in keeping with the Tag image, the phone looks top-end  – really sleek, it’s supposedly styled after race cars. Buyers can customize their phones’ cases in a variety of materials, from rose gold to titanium,  just as they would a TAG watch. They can even add Calfskin-leather trim, or a sprinkling of diamonds, for good measure.

One fly in the ointment could be the fact that while consumers buy a watch for a lifetime – or at least to last for many years, they tend to change their phones to the latest model fairly often; at the price tag of a Tag Smartphone, that’s a bit heavy on the pocket. Will be interesting to see how this pans out. Meanwhile, kudos to Tag for not burying their heads in the sand, trying to adapt to changing consumer habits and being bold enough to experiment. A good effort, for sure.

  • Zenobia Driver

October 31, 2012 at 9:00 am 5 comments

Solving a driver’s investment dilemma – part 2

(Continued from last week’s post)

Mahesh’ employers were really intrigued with this riddle and decided that there had to be a solution out there – after all, this was a situation faced by many people in the same income band as Mahesh. They decided to do a little research of their own and understand the solutions adopted by others – spoke to their maids, the neighbour’s maids, a few colleague’s drivers etc., they also spoke to a jeweler that they knew. They finally came up with a few interesting solutions.

The first suggestion was that Mahesh invest in a gold coin with a small hook on top, one that could be used as the second pendant on any necklace. This would solve the usability problem and ensure that it could be used as jewelry on social occasions. Mahesh’ wife shot down this idea though – she’d seen her mother and grandmother wear such pendants, and felt that such jewelry would look old-fashioned and signal that they lacked the money for buying a prettier pendant.

The second solution, suggested after much research and discussion, was to invest in buying a thin plain gold bangle. As they found out, the least amount of gold is wasted during making a plain gold bangle and the labour charges / making charges are proportionately lower than that for other forms of jewelry, hence the price charged is mostly the price of the gold. Thus you get good value for the money you pay, and the bangle is a piece of jewelry that can be proudly worn at social occasions, multiple bangles neither detract from beauty nor from social status. Also, if you decide to remake a plain gold bangle at a later stage, you don’t lose much since making charges were low and most of the value of the gold is retained.

While this solution sounded attractive, they realized that it was workable only for a much higher income group. With Mahesh’ savings, a gold bangle that he could afford would be such a thin strand of gold that it would not retain its shape and would get deformed easily, and then it’s utility as jewelry would drop drastically. So that sounded the death knell for the gold bangle option.

A solution was finally discovered via Suganthi, a neighbour’s maid. Suganthi’s household income was the same as that of Mahesh, and Suganthi’s family lived in a chawl quite close to the one in which Mahesh lived. Every year, Suganthi bought a 1 gm plain gold ring from a small jeweler nearby – the ring was small and affordable, and could be used as jewelry. After buying such rings for a few years, Suganthi would return to the same jeweler and use the rings to get a pair of bangles or some other jewelry made. She had no worries about the purity of the gold in the rings as she would be returning to the same jeweler to get the bangles made.

Viola ! A neat solution indeed.

 

  • Zenobia Driver

 

 

 

October 16, 2012 at 5:56 am 2 comments

Solving a driver’s investment dilemma – part 1

A friend’s driver, let’s call him Mahesh, was thinking seriously about how to invest his limited monthly savings wisely. Among the options he was considering were fixed deposits in banks, savings deposits in banks, a local chit fund, an insurance policy, and like all Indians, purchase of gold. He was quite firm that at least a part of his savings, if not most of it, would go into buying gold each year; he had a young daughter and was already thinking ahead to her marriage and the jewelry required, plus he knew that gold prices only went up over time and it was a good safeguard against inflation. His parents, his neighbours, his friends, all said so, and community wisdom accumulated over several years couldn’t be wrong.

As Dhanteras was approaching, he’d started thinking seriously of purchasing some gold this year. He had some concerns about buying gold though, primary among these the fear of being cheated on the promised gold quality by the shop he bought it from. For this reason, his wife and he had both spoken to neighbours and family members that had bought jewelry over the last few years to find out which jewelry shops could be trusted.

Secondly, he didn’t want to buy jewelry that would be out of fashion when his precious daughter grew up and have to be melted down and remade with all the attendant tension of low quality gold – or worse still, copper – being added to it. To add to these, gold necklaces were not cheap and he wasn’t sure that even his annual savings would add up to one. Most of the jewelry shops that allowed a customer to pay for jewelry in monthly installments offered schemes of 3-6 months, wherein the monthly EMI would be Rs. 1000-Rs. 1500 for just simple earrings, even this was too much for him to bear.

Stuck in a quandary, he decided to discuss this matter with his employers – perhaps he was even hoping for a small loan in addition to their advice. His employers felt that the chit fund option was the worst among those that he was considering and wanted to ensure that he stayed away from that; they understood his hunger for gold and all it represented – a hedge against inflation, a signifier of status, prosperity etc. They were against giving him a loan too often; finally they mentioned to him the option of buying gold coins; he could buy a coin of whatever weight suited his budget, 2gm, 5 gm, 10 gm etc. If he bought ones with the BIS stamp on them, he could be assured of quality. And they’d appreciate in price like gold jewelry, could be sold or pawned in emergencies if need be, and could be melted down to make jewelry for his daughter when the appropriate time came. They were quite sure that this would be a good solution to his dilemma. But little did they know the intricacies of human behavior and all the attitudes, beliefs, and environmental factors – often tangential ones – that influence it.

Though this seemed a solution to his problems, he baulked at the idea.

“I will buy gold coins once I’ve bought enough jewelry; kuchh pehenne ke liye bhi hona chahiye naa (there should be something to wear too)”

To him the utility of gold coins was much lower than that of gold jewelry, as jewelry could be worn by his wife and daughter at various social functions over the years and hence had a utility value – in terms of adornment as well as signaling status – and an investment value. And he couldn’t think of what to do with the gold coins until it was time to sell them or melt them and remake into jewelry ? And wasn’t the latter a huge headache that was better avoided ?

How did his employers help him find a solution to his problems ? And they did find a really neat solution – one that addressed all his concerns and was affordable. We’ll reveal their solution to you next week; until then, do let us know if you have any thoughts or ideas that we could pass on to Mahesh.

  • Zenobia Driver

October 9, 2012 at 8:09 am 4 comments

Update

Sometime last year, we’d run a series of posts on the topic on dealing with the challenge of ‘need, but don’t want’ in the health and wellness domain – you can read the posts in the series here, here, here and here. These discussed the problem of physiological (and often, medical) need for the product, but no desire to buy from the consumer; it’s a topic that we keep thinking about and researching ourselves, while keeping our eyes peeled for information on this topic from other sources.

As we mentioned in one of these posts :

In the healthcare space, while it’s tempting to say that there is the tangible benefit of getting better and that should matter to patients, the basic issue is that all the ill-effects of ailments such as diabetes, high cholesterol or BP are typically not evident immediately, thus, the benefit of taking medication regularly and of making other lifestyle modifications is unclear to many patients. Habit change is always hard, when the reward for it is nebulous and indeterminate, it only becomes more so.

Recently, thanks to my friends R & G, I came across this TED Talk that threw more light on this subject and I just had to share it with readers of this blog. In a nutshell, the speaker says that giving people medical information in a form that they can comprehend and that helps them see the way ahead to better outcomes, can actually boost their motivation to do something to achieve those outcomes.

A few sentences from the transcript of the talk are reproduced below to whet your appetite, hope you actually watch the entire video after reading these.

You’re looking at things where people are actually given information, and they’re not following through with it. It’s a problem that manifests itself in diabetes, obesity, many forms of heart disease, even some forms of cancer- when you think of smoking. Those are all behaviours where people know what they’re supposed to do. They know what they’re supposed to be doing, but they’re not doing it.

……

But for as much as clinical medicine agonises over behaviour change, there’s not a lot of work done in terms of trying to fix that problem. So the crux of it comes down to this notion of decision-making – giving people information in a form that doesn’t just educate them or inform them, but actually leads them to make better decisions, better choices in their lives. 

  • Zenobia Driver

September 7, 2012 at 10:41 am 2 comments

Jagriti, Boyie and PiggyMojo

I recently heard about an interesting example of an innovative communication vehicle used to convey social messages to an audience. The messages were of the sort that could be boring for the audience but were important for them, and needed not just to be understood, but to spur them on from understanding to action; hence the communication needed to generate a high degree of involvement and engagement with the audience.

The solution adopted by Phicus in their work with Grameen Financial Services – a South India based MFI, was the creation of a character that the audience of ladies from low income households could easily identify with – a woman called Jagriti. Jagriti is a member of an MFI and writes letters about her experiences which cover topics related to financial education such as opening a bank account, various government schemes and how they are useful to her etc., to social topics such as the evils of drinking or not allowing children to defecate in the open. These letters are read in the MFI members’ meetings and the women have come to associate themselves closely with this character. Phicus found out that this was a great way of teaching and the recall rate of the concepts by the member women was very high. This link connects to a video about this program and its results, watch from 3:00 minutes onwards if you only have time to see the snippets from the meetings.

In case you found this example interesting, you can read about another such example in this article, this example is from Kenya and describes a cartoon character called Boyie created in order to reach out to young adults. This article gives several examples of efforts towards financial education, one of which is a program called PiggyMojo. No, I’m not going to describe this one at all, I’m confident the name is enough to make you click on the link and read the article.

    • Zenobia Driver

 

June 11, 2012 at 7:09 am Leave a comment

Male grooming – Influenced by Bollywood

Even though metrosexuality has been popular for over a decade the world over, it is only recently that men in India have taken to it in hordes. This might be because it is only recently that Bollywood male actors have embraced this phenomenon and started to shave their chest, flaunt wash-board abs and style (or over-style) their hair.

The majority of men aged 18-35 in India look to Bollywood film stars for styling and grooming trends – at times even subconsciously. It is astonishing how much influence films have on men in India. Films like ‘Bobby’ which made every young man in India start wearing bell-bottoms, ‘Dil Chahta Hai’ which made men grow soul-patches and drive down to Goa every chance they got, or more recently ‘Zindagi Na Milegi Dobara’ which has made every young man in India itch to make a trip to Spain with their guy friends.

Like you pointed out, companies realize this and have started to have young film stars endorse their beauty products. Alternative sub-cultures like emo, grunge and goth have also been around for over a decade but have started to come into mainstream India through films – like Prateik Babbar’s small yet memorable role in ‘Jaane Tu Ya Jaane Na’. I am sure that the focus of the youth will slowly move towards these sub-cultures and away from metrosexuality, more so as movies start embracing them.

By,

RJ

[Editor’s Note : If you do not recognise the alternative sub-cultures mentioned by RJ, fear not, the descriptions below will help.

Emo :

Emo is a style of rock music characterized by melodic musicianship and expressive, often confessional lyrics. It originated in the mid-1980s hardcore punk movement of Washington, D.C., where it was known as “emotional hardcore” or “emocore” and pioneered by bands such as ‘Rites of Spring’ and ‘Embrace’.

Today emo is commonly tied to both music and fashion as well as the emo subculture. Usually among teens, the term “emo” is stereotyped with wearing slim-fit jeans, sometimes in bright colors, and tight T-shirts (usually short-sleeved) which often bear the names of emo bands. Studded belts and black wristbands are common accessories in emo fashion. Some males also wear thick, black horn-rimmed glasses.

The emo fashion is also recognized for its hairstyles. Popular looks include long side-swept bangs, sometimes covering one or both eyes. Also popular is hair that is straightened and dyed black. Bright colors, such as blue, pink, red, or bleached blond, are also typical as highlights in emo hairstyles. Short, choppy layers of hair are also common. In the early 2000s, emo fashion was associated with a clean cut look, but as the style spread to younger teenagers, the style has become darker, with long bangs and emphasis on the color black replacing sweater vests.

Emo has been associated with a stereotype that includes being particularly emotional, sensitive, shy, introverted, or angst-ridden. It has also been associated with depression, self-injury, and suicide.

(Source – Wikipedia )

 

Goth :

Gothic fashion is a clothing style worn by members of the Goth subculture; a dark, sometimes morbid, eroticized fashion and style of dress. Typical Gothic fashion includes dyed black hair, black lips and black clothes. Both male and female goths wear dark eyeliner and dark fingernails. Styles are often borrowed from the Punks, Victorians, and Elizabethans. BDSM imagery and paraphernalia are also common.

The style initially emerged alongside the early 1980s Gothic rock scene.

Researcher Maxim W. Furek noted, “Goth is a revolt against the slick fashions of the 1970’s disco era and a protest against the colorful pastels and extravagance of the 1980’s. Black hair, dark clothing and pale complexions provide the basic look of the Goth Dresser. One can paradoxically argue that the Goth look is one of deliberate overstatement as just a casual look at the heavy emphasis on dark flowing capes, ruffled cuffs, pale makeup and dyed hair demonstrate a modern-day version of late Victorian excess.”

(Source – Wikipedia)

 

Grunge :

Grunge (sometimes referred to as the Seattle sound) is a subgenre of alternative rock that emerged as a fusion of  punk, alternative, and heavy metal during the mid-1980s in the American state of Wahington, particularly in the Seattle area. Inspired by hardcore punk, metal, and indie rock, grunge is generally characterized by heavily distorted electric guitars, contrasting song dynamics, and apathetic or angst-filled lyrics. The grunge aesthetic is stripped-down compared to other forms of rock music, and many grunge musicians were noted for their unkempt appearances and rejection of theatrics.

Grunge concerts were known for being straightforward, high-energy performances. Grunge bands rejected the complex and high budget presentations of many musical genres, including the use of complex light arrays, pyrotechnics, and other visual effects unrelated to playing the music. Stage acting was generally avoided. Instead the bands presented themselves as no different from minor local bands. Jack Endino said in the 1996 documentary Hype! that Seattle bands were inconsistent live performers, since their primary objective was not to be entertainers, but simply to “rock out”.

Clothing commonly worn by grunge musicians in Washington consisted of thrift store items and the typical outdoor clothing (most notably flannel shirts) of the region, as well as a generally unkempt appearance. The style did not evolve out of a conscious attempt to create an appealing fashion; music journalist Charles R. Cross said, “[Nirvana frontman] Kurt Cobain was just too lazy to shampoo,” and Sub Pop’s Jonathan Poneman said, “This [clothing] is cheap, it’s durable, and it’s kind of timeless. It also runs against the grain of the whole flashy aesthetic that existed in the 80s.”

 (Source – Wikipedia )

End of Editor’s note]

April 4, 2012 at 8:45 am 4 comments

Masterchef – reflection of reality

 

I am an ardent fan of the show Masterchef Australia and was most upset when the last season ended. I had been seeing promos of the India and US series of Masterchef which were slotted to start right after the Australia series ended. Although these promos didn’t look as promising as the Australia one – I couldn’t keep myself from watching a few episodes … and I soon realized that each of these shows was a reflection of the social, cultural and economic environments prevalent in each of these countries.

The original version was the British Masterchef. When Masterchef Australia was first launched it was criticized as a huge departure from the original British version due to the change in format and “making it over- the-top by adding more drama and storytelling and a sense of theatre.” If this is what the critics thought of the Australia one, wait till they see the India and USA versions !

 

Masterchef Australia:

Since the first version of the show to be aired in India was the Australia series – for me that show is the benchmark. Perhaps I have been over-exposed to the zoom-in-zoom-out dha dha dha dhan music of the Indian soaps and reality shows and due to that I found Masterchef Australia to be a refreshing, non- spiteful and constructive competitive show.

The show is a reflection of the cultural diversity in Australia – this is mirrored not only in the ethnic diversity of the participants but also in their cooking styles as well as the challenges and ingredients presented to the contestants. During the course of the show, we saw them using curry powder and preparing “naan-bread”, cooking Greek-Cypriotic dishes, recreating the classic French Duck à l’orange and competing in Spanish-themed invention tests and a Korea-inspired mystery box challenge.

They were also exposed to a much more diverse pantry – and the contestants were well aware of these exotic ingredients and how to use them. The fact that they were aware of such exquisite, exotic and expensive ingredients and had some experience of either having tried them at a restaurant or used them in a recipe at home also echoed their relatively higher standard of living and economic stature.

No doubt that there is drama in the show – but it is all focused around cooking disasters or running low on time or cutting fingers at critical moments or forgetting an ingredient and at most about missing their families and how they need them for inspiration to cook and perform better. But all contestants live cordially, like-a-family and there’s a real bond that comes across. They help each other through tough times, through recipes, sharing ingredients. This is perhaps a reflection of the general social environment of the country – cordial, helpful, friendly and not fiercely competitive.

 

Masterchef India:

The first thing that jumps out is the differences in the economic and social backgrounds of participants in the Indian series vis-à-vis the Australian. There are challenges each week where the winner takes home Rs.1 lakh – and most often they plan to use this prize money to pay off a loan, to pay for education of their children, to buy a house, for medical needs, etc. In contrast, the prize money won in Australia was always spoken of to be used in pursuit of their culinary dreams – start their café, go to culinary school, etc. It seemed like the primary objective in India was to take home the moolah; making a career in the culinary world seemed secondary.

The contestants’ exposure to various kitchen apparatus and ingredients was also much lower. For one of the challenges, the contestants were taken to Hong Kong and exposed to south-east Asian produce and they each had to be walked through what these were, what it would taste like, what it would add to a recipe in terms of flavor and texture and how it could be cooked. These same ingredients seemed very basic and common in the Australian or USA version, but not so in the Indian one. Similarly they were each given a different cooking apparatus or tools but each one needed to be explained and demonstrated.

Although, compared to the first season the drama was a lot more toned down this time, yet if you compare it to the Australian version, it was overly dramatic. The emotional ranting was almost nauseating. This one episode particularly stood out where not only the contestants got emotional but also the judges touched the feet of the eliminated contestant! Here’s the link if you want to view it. 

 

Masterchef USA:

The first thing one notices is the excessive and casual use of profanity on the show. Every other sentence has a “beep” in it! Not only amongst contestants but also the judges! It seemed totally reflective of language used during social interactions by a significant (or a certain) section of the population, the kind of drama and language used in other shows, the acceptability of such loose use of obscenities on television. Just watch the first 60 seconds of this clip – there are 4 beeps and 4 other beep-worthy words – all in just one minute !

Also, the competition amongst contestants was fierce. No one was friends with each other, no one helped each other, there was a constant blame game of copying ideas, menus, recipes, etc. Team challenges were highly tense and frosty. There were glacial looks exchanged, people didn’t communicate, some people didn’t speak to each another and no one even claimed responsibility for their faults, they always blamed each other for their failures. The current economic environment, the lack of job security, cut-throat competition in the society was all reflected here.

There was a sort-of lack of respect for the judges even ! In the Indian and Australian version, the judges were looked upon for guidance, advice, mentoring, counseling, etc., whereas in the US version the judges were addressed and treated very casually and callously by the participants and there didn’t seem to be a mentor-mentee or expert-amateur kind of relationship.

 

Such stark differences in the three shows, in their participants, in the judges, in the formats – and these all seem reflective of their primary audiences and their attitudes and preferences.

Having said all this, it also leads me to wonder what thoughts run through foreigners’ minds about us as a society when they watch saas-bahu weepies on TV. Or ‘Dabangg’ !

By,

Roshni Jhaveri

March 1, 2012 at 7:00 am 3 comments

Almost an Adult !

I

I recently went out to lunch with a couple of friends and heard one of their daughters protesting against being described as a kid; “I’m NOT a kid, I’m almost a teenager”, the young lady complained, bristling with indignation at the ripe old age of 7.

Being well past that age myself (well, chronologically speaking, at least), I was still smiling as I repeated the anecdote to a friend at office the next day. And then found that something similar had happened in her house as well.

Rakhis with cartoon characters

Her young cousins had recently objected to the cartoon character kiddish rakhis she used to tie on their wrists at Rakshabandhan and expressed a demand for adult rakhis, “like the ones you tie on bhaiyya”, bhaiyya being at least 20 years older than them. But they stood their ground and insisted that being treated as a ‘kid’ was not something they wanted, they wanted to be respected as adults / grown-ups.  Yes, next year she is buying similar ‘plain resham ki dori’ rakhis for bhaiyya and the pre-teens.

 Why mention these two anecdotes on the blog ? Simply because they illustrate how kids want to be seen and treated as grown-ups, and make their own decisions; hence it’s imperative for a brand that wants to connect with kids to speak to them without talking down to them, not an easy task at all.

 

II

A few relatively recent ads have managed to speak to kids and explain the benefit of the product in a fun and easy-to-understand-and-connect-with manner.

This scrabble ad gives the (perceived) nerdy desire to know more words a cooler tinge by showing how ability with words can help get you out of trouble.

This Complan ad and this one have the brand speaking to the child, showing situations that many can identify with and saying ‘complan pijiye, farq dekhiye’.

[As an aside : there have been concerns expressed about the credibility of the specific claim of height increase; also, I wonder whether it’s fair to play on a kid’s insecurity about short height.]

It’s especially interesting to see how the brand has updated it’s communication over the years; contrast any of the current set of Complan ads with this old ad that spoke to the mother and told her about ‘all the 23 vital foods including milk protein that growing children need’, nope I can’t see any kid I know today being even remotely influenced by that message. And this one, a little later, clearly aims at tugging at the mother’s heartstrings.

By,

Zenobia Driver

December 29, 2011 at 6:38 am Leave a comment

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