Posts filed under ‘Social Media Marketing’

Zapped by Zappos !

Zappos logo

I first heard of Zappos from a colleague that attended a seminar on Social Media Marketing a few years ago. At that seminar, they were one of the examples mentioned – the ones that got it right, not the other variety of example. Zappos is known for selling premium shoes ; that’s the product category they began with though they’ve now expanded to many others. While that’s the primary product they sell, they figured out early that the benefit to women buying premium shoes is the boost it gives their confidence. So they used Facebook to identify themselves with that benefit, not just with the product they were selling – their Fb page spoke about female confidence and boosting this through corporate dressing, apt make-up for work, etc. and shoes were just a small part of it.

Heard of them again recently from another colleague who’d just moved back to the U.S. This time it was their amazing customer service that impressed both of us; this is a company that actually lives up to the ‘powered by service’ tag-line.

Prior to a hiking holiday, the colleague and her husband had bought hiking shoes on Zappos, but realised on delivery that the shoes didn’t fit. They needed to return two pairs of shoes and the Zappos team erroneously mailed them only one return label. So the couple rang the call centre and explained the problem to the rep – since they were travelling soon they didn’t even have time to select another pair on the site and have them delivered, and hence it had to be a return, not an exchange. As I said earlier, this company actually lives up to their promise of good service, the problem was promptly resolved.

But after that, in contrast to a usual call centre’s robotic “thank you for shopping with us. We hope you choose our services again” dialogue, the friendly Zappos rep asked the couple where they were headed and chatted about the trip, the national parks they were visiting etc. When he found out that they were landing in Vegas before driving to the Grand Canyon, he actually invited them to drop by and visit the Zappos factory which is in Vegas – a gesture that totally wowed them and made them Zappos loyalists for luife.

This article mentions some of the reasons that Zappos reps are so different from typical call centre reps. Some excerpts below :

Most companies who rely on phone centres to do business have time limits – they want their staff to process a certain number of calls per hour. But not Zappos – they field over 5,000 phone calls per day, and there no time limits.

 

As CEO Tony Hsieh (pronounced Shay) says, they actually want to talk to their customers. He believes the telephone is one of the best branding devices out there. The way he looks at it, you have your customer’s undivided attention for 5 or 10 minutes – and what smart marketer doesn’t want that??

He also firmly maintains that every phone call is an opportunity to WOW their customers.

 

If an item is out of stock, Zappos staff will search out three other competitor’s websites and direct customers there. Even though they will lose that sale. But there is a reason they do that: They are not trying to maximize the transaction, they’re trying to build a lifelong relationship. 

For more on Zappos customer service, you can also read this article.

  • Zenobia Driver

With inputs from Roshni Jhaveri and Gunjan Bhatia

June 5, 2013 at 4:18 pm Leave a comment

Updates – on brand bloopers, gold and vitamin water

What more could you ask for in terms of variety, eh ? Well, let’s dive right into our topics.

Brand bloopers

In Feb this year, we’d mentioned how we felt that a Gillette campaign seemed to be milking a tragedy in India while ostensibly trying to express a higher moral position. And in March, this post commented on the Ford Figo ads that caused such outrage at the time. The post pointed out that something posted publicly on the internet can be replicated in a very short amount of time, and once something is out it’s impossible to contain it. Brands are now being built in real time, but they can unravel just as quickly, especially if they respond / communicate inappropriately in times of social or national tragedy.

Frank Eliason, Director Global Social Media at Citi, gives a real-time example of how quickly social media shines the spotlight on any online fumbles that a brand makes. The article includes pics of the ridiculous tweets from Epicurious, an online mag for foodies, after the Boston tragedy.

This post by David Armano – Managing Director of Edelman Digital – has a simple but useful checklist for how to handle branded content online during sensitive times. Even if you didn’t click on the other links given in this post, suggest that you click on this one and read David Armano’s post.

 

Some attitudes towards Gold as an investment

This article in today’s paper reminded me of some posts we’d run late last year; in those, we’d written about the dilemma faced by Mahesh, a friend’s driver who wanted to invest his meagre savings wisely (see posts here and here).

In our earlier posts, we’d written about many commonly held beliefs and attitudes – for instance, like many others, Mahesh believed that gold prices only went up and it was a good hedge against inflation. Within the options in gold, he’d rather invest in gold jewellery than gold coins; in his words, “I will buy gold coins once I’ve bought enough jewelry; kuchh pehenne ke liye bhi hona chahiye naa (there should be something to wear too)”.

Other interesting facets of these beliefs relate to gold and loans. A lot of Mahesh’ friends and neighbours were against buying gold jewellery on EMI schemes and would much rather buy whatever they could afford to with their annual savings; after all, “Yeh tho udhaar hua, aur Lakshmi ko udhaar ke paison ke sahaare ghar kaise laa sakte hain (this is like a loan, and how can we bring Lakshmi – the Goddess of wealth – home on borrowed money)”.

And since this gold jewellery is associated with Lakshmi, the Goddess of wealth, and it is a symbol of the household’s prosperity and status, pawning it is absolutely the last option; though firms such as Mannapuram Gold Loans, Muthoot etc. have gone some distance towards removing that stigma and making the transaction reliable and transparent.

Vitamin water – Danone B’lue’s National launch

In Dec 2011, we’d blogged about seeing Danone B’lue banners all over Pune. This month, we noticed in news articles that B’lue has now been launched nationally. With the launch, this beverage opens a new segment in the Indian Ready to drink beverage segment. Tarun Arora, Country Head, Danone-Narang Beverages said that B’lue was launched as a pilot in Pune followed by a soft launch in Mumbai, and that the beverage was very well accepted in the market.

Will be interesting to watch how the brand fares, and whether the vitamin water market becomes a viable niche in the Indian beverages market.

Compiled by,

Zenobia Driver

April 18, 2013 at 9:23 am 2 comments

Crowdsourcing

The dictionary definition of Crowdsourcing: the practice of obtaining needed services, ideas, or content by soliciting contributions from a large group of people and especially from the online community rather than from traditional employees or suppliers.

Its advantages are numerous – access to a larger talent pool, lower cost barriers, new, innovative, out-of-the box ideas and content generation, consumer engagement opportunity and the chance to really understand what the consumer wants. Of course this has been facilitated by technological advances and the Internet.

Crowdsourcing is a recent phenomenon in India. Here are a few examples of successful crowdsourcing initiatives:

LAYS – Frito Lays ran a campaign called “Give Us You Dillicious Flavorduring the past year, asking consumers to suggest flavors for their potato wafers. They ran a nationwide contest and gathered over 1.35 million entries! Four flavors were shortlisted, then piloted across India for two months; this was when a promotion with the theme “Bachega Sirf Tastiest” (Survival of the tastiest) was run to seek consumer votes to decide which flavor continues to stay in the market (and who takes home the Rs.50 lakh prize and 1% sales revenue). The second phase of the campaign garnered over 4 million votes.

Traditional media, including TV, was used for supporting and driving consumers to the digital platform. Lays used Web 2.0 applications like Facebook, YouTube, Twitter extensively for its campaigns.

MAGGI – From a lonesome hostel-living student’s sustenance to a child’s evening snack to a trekkers reprieve from hunger, Nestle’s Maggi Noodles has, over time, been a part of everyone’s life. Maggi asked its loyalists to send in their favorite Maggi stories and their favorite Maggi recipes.

The latest Maggi ads are a series of short stories, showcasing consumers’ memories of Maggi. For instance, friends remember splitting Maggi after measuring it with a ruler; scouts members remember eating Maggi at a camp; while another person remembers serving Maggi when people were stuck in the Mumbai floods (Click here to view montage). The ad concludes with consumers being invited to share their own Maggi story, through which they can get a chance to feature on the Maggi packs or ads. The campaign generated over 30,000 stories, some of which were used to generate further ads based on these stories.

Maggi has launched 3 flavors basis the campaign – Trilling Curry, Tricky Tomato and Romantic Capsica.

BINGO – Another example of this is the ITC Bingo Mad Angles online campaign to create print and TV ads for it through an application. Users created 309 print ads and 69 video ads in just a month.

Active engagement is what crowdsourcing is all about. It enables companies to turn brand enthusiasts to loyalists and eventually advocates. It puts the customers first, makes them king and serves them what they really want, how they want it, as they want it. A win-win situation for both.

By,

Roshni Jhaveri

August 3, 2011 at 5:49 am Leave a comment

Who is using the Internet & Social Media?

Internet user & usage

  • Age – 19-40 years age group constitutes nearly 85% of Internet users

        In India, ~50% users of Facebook are between ages 18-25 years; another 25% are between ages 26-35 years

  • Gender/ Working status – 85% of Internet users are male, 11% are working women, 6% non-working women and 2% are housewives

        Out of a total 25 million Facebook users in India, 16 million are male

  • City tiers – Top ten cities (Mumbai, Delhi, Bangalore, Kolkata, Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, Surat and Nagpur) have only 37% of the total numbers of Internet users in India. 36% of all internet users can be found in small towns (like Udaipur, Belgaum, Mangalore, Nellore, Kozhikode, etc.) with a population of less than half a million.

        Out of the total 25 million Facebook users in India, 16 million users on Facebook are located in the top 10 cities using internet

  • Place of access – 40 million people in India access the Internet from work (confess now – you’re reading this blog while at office, aren’t you ? ), and 30 million from cafes, apart from 11 million households that have a broadband connection installed

        The percentage of people accessing the internet from office might explain why time spent on a site / blog / page is typically low, and the necessity for communication on the net to be in bite-sized chunks of information (we know this and yet we natter on and on in our posts! Put it down to self-indulgence.)

  • Usage – 97% are regular users (i.e. 2-3 times/ week), of these 79% of internet users use it daily 
  • Purpose of usage – 94% of internet users use the internet for email purposes, 73% use to download music followed by 56% for chatting. Other major purposes for using Internet are job searching (56%), social networking sites (54%) and finding information on search engines (52%)

 (Sources:  IGF, IMRB-IAMAI internet study, iCube report, Facebook) 

By,

Roshni Jhaveri

April 12, 2011 at 4:42 am 1 comment

Internet & Social Media are BIG, but how big is BIG?

Here are some statistics about the growing use of internet in India. (Source IGF, IMRB-IAMAI internet study, iCube report, Google stats)

  1. 102 million unique internet users in India. This implies 8.8% penetration rate.
    • Of the 102 million, 84 million are desktop internet users, 40 million are mobile internet users  and 22 million are ‘dual’ users – i.e. use both desktop and mobile interne
    • According to industry experts, this number is expected to rise to 250-300 million by 2015. These consumers are far more likely to be meeting their digital needs through mobile phones than through personal computers.
  2. There has also been a rise in the time spent on internet as the number of hours spent has gone up from 9.3 hrs/week to 15.7 hrs/week between 2008 and 2009; a 70% increase.
    • This can be attributed to innovative content delivery, improved applications, downloading music or videos, socializing through social networking sites and micro-blogging

To put this in perspective, let’s compare this to other, more mainstream communication channels:

  1. 103 million cable & satellite TV users in India (This does not include Doordarshan which is another 34 million users)
  2. Average time spent viewing TV is 16 hours/ week
  3. Daily circulation of the top 25 national and regional newspapers in India ranges from 0.6 million to 4.2 million each.

Those were the facts about the medium – clearly Internet in India is no longer a channel that can be ignored by a business. Now let’s take a look at the vehicles: (Growth rates basis unique users in March’10 vs. March’11, Source: adplanner.google.com)

  1. Web portals like Yahoo!, Rediff, Indiatimes grew at ~35%
  2. Social networking websites like Facebook grew at a whopping 175%, YouTube grew at 60%, LinkedIn grew at 45%, while Twitter growth was slower in India at 20%. Orkut’s popularity has faded to 20%.Twitter, Facebook, Yahoo, Google, Blogs, Youtube, etc.
  3. Blogs are not as popular anymore – Blogger didn’t show any growth in the past year and WordPress grew at 10%. That said, blogs are used as a source for information dissemination and not for entertainment or socializing. Therefore, they may still be useful for certain objectives and audience profiles.

The following table gives a snapshot of the viewership and usage of top 12 websites in India

Comparing websites

Not only do the social media sites have an increasing reach but they are also retaining visitors for a longer time.

Need we say more…

By,

Roshni Jhaveri

April 5, 2011 at 12:25 pm 8 comments

Big brother is watching – on the internet too!

Last post got me thinking about other government initiatives that could possibly have a social media presence and, more importantly, their success rates. Curiosity got the better of me; I started looking for other government-led pages and landed on the Delhi Traffic Police Facebook Page.

I discovered that this page was launched by the Delhi Traffic Police during the time of the Commonwealth Games to keep people posted about the traffic situation across the city and also receive feedback from commuters on any traffic troubles. Although the Games were temporary, this page continues to be hugely popular and has evolved to serve several more purposes. It now keeps citizens posted about the new drives by the Traffic police. In turn, citizens are using it as a forum to ask queries, express their grievances, share suggestions for improvement as well as report any traffic rule violators. Citizens have been uploading photographs of various traffic violations, which otherwise go unnoticed, like people driving without a helmet or having an incorrect number plate. Moreover, citizens are also reporting any improper behavior or violation by the traffic policemen as well. About 51,000 people are now following this page!

The Delhi Traffic Police also have a Twitter handle – where they constantly update regular traffic updates from across the city as well as forewarn city-dwellers about any upcoming events/ work that may be a hindrance to them in terms of traffic.

The police now have a dedicated team who just follow these social media channels and promptly reply and take actions on the postings. They have now also started issuing challans (tickets) to violators based on photographs posted on Facebook, clearly displaying the violator identity (i.e. number plate of vehicle) as well as the violation.

Of course (like in everything good), there is a debate about its appropriateness, validity of these photographs as well as safety of the reporters, yet there is no doubting the success of the Delhi Traffic Police Initiative. As they say – Mimicry is the best form of flattery – soon to follow suit were the traffic police departments of Goa, Pune, Gurgaon, Mumbai, Kolkatta & Hyderabad.

However, as the table shows, this seems to be one area in which the Delhi Traffic Police leaves the other city forces far behind.

By,

Roshni Jhaveri

March 29, 2011 at 4:42 am Leave a comment

Babudom Goes Social

From Facebook

Census Mascot

At some point in time, I had read about social media channels being deployed by governments in developed countries but never gave much thought to what our government may be doing in the same domain. Then recently, while researching about the Census 2011 study, I came across the Census Facebook page and I have to admit, I was surprised (pleasantly) to see one!

Who would have expected that the central government would use social media channels to garner awareness and emphasize importance of the exercise? Seems like social media has spread so far and so fast, that it hasn’t gone unnoticed by anyone! Facebook, Twitter & YouTube are the channels deployed by Census 2011.

Varsha Joshi, Director of Census Operations in Delhi said “Facebook is being increasingly accessed by the youth and the upwardly mobile section of the society, and it was necessary to reach out to them … and attempt to make them understand why it is so important to be counted. That is why there are posts giving out information about the census.

So far, the Facebook page has 14,324 fans and the Twitter page has 497 followers. To keep followers engaged, Census 2011 also ran a national photography contest with the theme “Strength in Numbers”. They received an overwhelming response with over 600 entries submitted and hundreds of people voting for each entry.

Census 2011 also used a YouTube channel to upload commercials and videos covering various themes in various languages. So far they have uploaded 76 videos on the channel which garnered 8,837 views.

In addition to social media, Census 2011 also used the digital space to post ads across popular websites in India such as Yahoo.co.in, MSD India, Rediffmail, Makemytrip, and news websites.

The 360⁰ marketing campaign is estimated to have cost Rs.30 crores which includes outreach, PR, digital & mass media (including these Sachin Tendulkar and Priyanka Chopra ads) ,

Though viewership figures seem a bit low, well begun is half done, as the popular saying goes.

Keep up the good work!

By,

Roshni Jhaveri



March 23, 2011 at 4:44 am 2 comments

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