Archive for November, 2015

Updates

We’d run a series of posts on the population distribution of various nations a few years ago and shown the transition of the age-wise demographic distribution of many countries from pyramid to either kite, dome or cylinder (read posts here, here, here). This video from the Economist shows how the population pyramid of the world is changing with time, and here’s an article from the same publication that mentions that from now on children in schools and colleges will learn about the population ‘dome’ and not the population ‘pyramid’ ! Monumental change, isn’t it ?

We’d also looked at some implications of India’s so-called demographic dividend in two posts (read them here and here ). This article from the Mint offers a worrisome perspective on how the low skill levels of our young workforce may undo much of the benefit we hope to reap from it in the manufacturing sphere. It isn’t a very encouraging perspective, so if you’re already in a blue mood, read the article anther day.

Changing topics, a few links on interesting articles related to behavioural sciences.

This video on the Backwards Brain Bicycle is a rather entertaining look at biases – or neural pathways that are so natural we don’t even recognise them, unlearning the bias and then learning to think differently, and how much time it takes.

One article that’s about changing people’s behaviours and an experiment to test which works – facts, science, emotion, or fear.

An article on language, surprisingly on how the language you use changes your view of the world. Incidentally, bilinguals have a lot of tangible benefits, including protection against dementia – so that should be good for all us Indians who know English and Hindi and a mother-tongue, and often Sanskrit or French or some official third language from school.The last paragraph is especially interesting – ‘when judging risk, bilinguals also tend to make more rational economic decisions in a second language. In contrast to one’s first language, it tends to lack the deep-seated, misleading affective biases that unduly influence how risks and benefits are perceived.’ I wonder whether this lack of bias also manifests itself when bilinguals think of other subjective issues in a second language, say opinions of politicians, or climate change, or co-workers for that matter.

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Zenobia Driver

November 7, 2015 at 6:06 am Leave a comment


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