Archive for October, 2013

Mine Healthier Than Yours

 

McVitie’s Digestive Biscuits and Parle Digestive Marie recently came out with ads exposing their competitors and attempting to strongly differentiate themselves amongst the ever-growing list of biscuit options now available to the consumers.

McVitie’s Digestive – What’s inside your biscuit?

McVitie’s Digestive biscuit ad claims that it is the only biscuit in the market that is made up of whole wheat as compared to others that contain refined flour (maida), hence positioning itself as the healthier option even among digestive biscuits which consumers believe are healthier than regular ones. “The commercial elevates the digestive category compared to regular biscuits by honing onto a relevant category truth. The objective is to tell consumers why McVitie’s is better,” said Jayant Kapre, President, United Biscuits.

Parle Digestive – Fat Kum, Fit Zyada


Parle Digestive biscuit ad claims that all other digestive biscuits add a lot of fat to their biscuit to make it taste better, but Parle Digestive has significantly less fat (50%) while still tasting good, making it the healthier option for the consumer.

 

Criticizing and exposing competitor brands seems to be the common route chosen by the brands. Given that the digestive biscuit segment in India is growing fast owing to increased awareness about improved health and wellbeing amongst consumers as well as the simultaneously increasing affordability, it is getting more and more difficult to differentiate oneself in this “better-for-you” foods segment. So while one claims to be refined flour-free and another with 50% less fat, not only are these biscuits positioned on the digestive health platform, but also trying to occupying significant space in the weight management/ weight loss platforms. So while they are trying to differentiate from one another basis the ingredient, the final health benefit(s) they are offering is the same.

So are they really being successful in this ‘mine healthier than yours’ strategy ? I don’t think so. What do you think? Do share your thoughts.

 

  • Roshni Jhaveri
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October 22, 2013 at 6:39 am 3 comments

Reactions to Chipotle’s ‘Scarecrow’ ad

The recent ‘scarecrow’ ad by Chipotle Mexican Grill has such a superb music score that anyone who catches even a bit of it notices it and wants more. The entire ad, in fact, stands out as a really well-made short film. It even has – ooops, seems to have – a clear message. But whether that is the right message or the one that the firm wanted to convey is debatable.

[Before I go any further, let me give a bit of background about Chipotle.

Chipotle Mexican Grill, Inc. and its subsidiaries (Chipotle) operate restaurants throughout the United States, as well as two restaurants in Toronto, Canada and two in London, England. As of December 2011, Chipotle operated 1,230 restaurants. The Company’s restaurants serve a menu of burritos, tacos, burrito bowls (a burrito without the tortilla) and salads.

Chipotle encourages sustainable farming methods (turning animals out to pasture) over battery farming.  A major selling point for the fast-food chain has been the fresh and sustainably grown ingredients, including pork and beef, in its burritos and tacos. To an extent, Chipotle’s commercials mirror Chipotle’s own story as they began moving away from using factory farm suppliers 10 or so years ago. Chipotle believed it had the right message already in its emphasis on more natural food; the company had shifted to more naturally grown produce and to beef, pork and chicken produced without antibiotics.  ]

The current commercial takes attempts to take swipes at giant companies that treat food like another product to process and contrasts that with food made in sustainable ways that is fresh and wholesome. However, the ad is a bit confusing, misleading even ; while Chipotle intended to send out the message that they don’t use battery-farmed meat, the ad makes it seem like a vegetarian chain almost.

Also, if you don’t already know what Chipotle is, you’re still left wondering at the end of the ad – it doesn’t even mention the name of the chain prominently in any frame. It can be added to the list of ads that could work for a whole bunch of products – from organics to farming to vegetarianism or to a combination of these ; maybe a good ad for Wholefoods or Trader Joe’s, not for a Mexican chain.

In terms of atmosphere, this ad also had a slightly haunting quality, unlike the earlier ad which was far more cheerful. Makes one slightly uncomfortable, which is probably not the mood you want to be in when you’re trying to decide on a place to eat.

 

To sum up : As a short film – beautiful. As an ad – doesn’t quite cut it.

 

In case you found the post interesting, you can read more about the ads by clicking on the links below :

NYT article about their first ad 

Articles about the recent ‘scarecrow ad’, here, here and here.

  • Escape Velocity team and friends

October 9, 2013 at 2:39 pm 6 comments


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