Archive for May, 2013

Flipkart’s apparel ads – mixed reactions

We’d commented on the Flipkart ‘No Kidding, No Worries’ series of ads in this post in 2011. To summarise – we unequivocally liked those ads and thought that they used the techniques of kids in adult situations well to make their point with warmth and humour.

However, we have mixed opinions on the next two series of ads.

Some of us felt that the second series of ads – ‘Shopping ka naya address’ (see ads here, here and here) felt a bit dull without the tinge of humour that rounded off the ‘No Kidding’ series so well. However, the third and current series of ads for Flipkart’s apparel range (see the ads here, here and here) seems to have tapped into that vein of humour again, albeit inconsistently. These ads used the juxtaposition of a traditional / formal mode of dressing vs. a modern and funky one rather well, especially in the Carnatic music ad which is the cutest of the lot. That ad definitely breaks through the clutter, it makes you smile and notice that flipkart’s now talking about apparel.

Others among us felt that this this series stretched the technique of using kids too far. The ‘No kidding’ series used kids well to address the trust issue that worried consumers when shopping on the internet and to make the point of ease of shopping; even the first few ads of the ‘shopping ka naya address’ series were more or less addressing the trust issue of e-commerce and the kids bought this out dramatically.

However, the format fell flat the moment they moved from addressing issues and benefits where the use of kids was relevant to making the point to just using the kids as a cute technique.

We haven’t been able to reach a consensus on these ads yet. What’s your opinion, on which side do you weigh in – do drop us a comment and let us know.

  • Escape Velocity Team and Friends

May 27, 2013 at 7:33 am 2 comments

Can we can the crocodile tears and fake caring now ?

More than once, I’ve griped on this blog about a brand purportedly speaking up for women but doing so in such an opportunistic and artificial manner that it put me off.

Well, here’s one that came close to getting it right, though even this one is almost but not quite there : 

One thing that worked for me, they went for a small part of a larger problem, and didn’t try and tackle the whole problem itself. Also, they leavened it with a bit of humour and didn’t end up sounding sentimental, melodramatic, over-sincere etc. As I’d said in this post, a heavy message is better delivered with a light and deft touch.

Though it’s ironic that the vehicle chosen to deliver this message is someone who danced to lyrics as misogynistic as ‘wanna be my chhammak chhallo’, the only reason I’d perhaps pardon that bit of mis-casting and refrain from mocking it is that since he also did the self-mocking parody ‘Dard-e-disco’.

A few quick tips for brands thinking of appropriating causes :

  • You have to sound authentic and empathetic
  • Not just in communication, but this has to show in other aspects of what the firm does too, else it sounds hollow and shallow ; think ‘Body Shop’, for a great example of this
  • The link to the earlier campaigns and to the firm’s image has to be natural and not a force-fit; this is one thing that totally works for the Tata Tea ‘Jaago Re’ campaign and for this ad in particular. Watch earlier ‘Jaago Re’ ads here, here, herehere  and here
  • And if it’s a cause, maybe the message can be one that makes people question status quo, and doesn’t just say things in a melodramatic manner ; even better, one that links to a specific action that furthers the cause ; no, buying the product or service is not the type of action I’m referring to here

Incidentally, while discussing the specific question raised in this ad, ‘why isn’t the woman’s name ever mentioned before the man’s ?’, a friend just mentioned to me that the ancient call was always ‘Jai Siya Ram’, so tradition does not demand that the woman’s name always follow the man’s.

Now that’s a good ad, one that gives rise to an involved discussion !

By,
Zenobia Driver

May 14, 2013 at 9:45 am Leave a comment

Technology – Age No Bar

A few months ago we ran this post on how toddlers are adapting to the latest technology and how it is changing their interaction with other common things.

But it is not only the young ones who are adapting but also the elderly, especially so with the arrival of grand children (or in some cases, great-grandchildren) in their families.

An-elderly-old-woman-uses-iphone

Example A, 83 year old great-grandmother of 4 toddlers now, lives in Mumbai with her family spread across Dubai, Europe and the US. When she first became a great-grandmother 5 years ago, she switched from a regular Nokia phone to a Blackberry “so that my grand daughter in Dubai can send me pictures everyday over BBM”… not only did she pick up the lingo, but also familiarized herself with using it very proficiently, and loving the fact that now she could not only get her great-granddaughter’s pictures but also “check updates on the rest of the family through BBM updates”.

Two years after this, she bought an i-Pad to “…. to Skype with my growing babies…. how else would they be able to see me and hear me… I tell them stories and sing songs to them and they love it… I love seeing their reaction.” Last year, she was mighty impressed with her daughter’s iPhone5, and decided to move from Blackberry to iPhone5 because “all my grand children have now moved from Blackberry to iPhone, they are all on What’s App now, no one BBMs, so I thought why not move myself. Plus iPhone allows me to Facetime with them all instantly.”

Moving from a Blackberry to an iPhone is not always easy, the interfaces and interactions are completely different and she always manages to surprise me with her willingness to try and readily adapt new technology.

 

Example B, 65 year old grandmother to a 2 year old now, lives in Mumbai, but daughter and grandchild live in Dubai. She only got a phone a couple years ago, a regular no-fuss Nokia, only on the insistence of her daughter who worried about her. But as her grandchild was growing up, she felt the need to be in touch, so she learnt to use a computer and found it very cumbersome and complicated, but still managed to somehow use Skype after some struggle with the poor internet connections, high start-up times of computers and the need to coordinate times with the grandchild and daughter to actually talk over Skype. Frustrated with this, she decided she needed an easier way to be able to see her grandchild when she wanted, so she went to the market on her own, explained her problems to the mobile dealer and came home with a fancy new Samsung phone, with all requisite apps downloaded and ready to use! Surprise surprise to her daughter! She now uses What’s App very well and is happy to just get photos and video clips of her grand child instantly. She recently self-taught herself to record audio and video clips herself and send them to her grandchild as well, and she is mighty proud.

 

Example C, 58 year old who recently became a grandmother, in the past always argued with her children about buying her a simple phone when they’d get her phones with a camera or with a radio or with a touchscreen, etc. But as soon as she had spent one month with her granddaughter and it was time to go back home, she knew she had to find a way see her grand-daughter when she pleased. So she asked around amongst her friends and after having figured everything out, asked her son to get her an Android phone! Android phone! Son was shocked to know that she even knew that there were Android phones, leave alone what an Android phone was!!! Promptly she asked for What’s App to be downloaded on to it and voila! she could get pictures of her granddaughter on her phone. Not only that, now she can proudly show her pictures to her friends, family, trainer, beautician, anyone who asks, cause it’s right on her phone!!

 

I don’t know if its the love and affection that a grandparent feels towards their grandchild that has made them adapt to new technology, or whether we owe it to the developers who’ve created interfaces which are so simple to adopt and so intuitive that even people, especially women who’ve hardly ever used calculators and computers in their prime, are so quickly and deftly adapting them.

 

  • Roshni Jhaveri

May 6, 2013 at 6:46 am 4 comments


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